Eildon-Hills-Scotland-St-Cuthberts-Way

St Cuthbert’s Way

from $1,675.00

St Cuthbert’s Way follows the story of a 7th century saint who traveled through Scotland and northern England, spreading the Gospel and performing healing miracles. Beginning at Melrose, where the saint started his ministry, and ending at Holy Island where he ended his days, the trail passes through scenery of great variety and beauty.

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All about the St Cuthbert’s Way.
  • Exploring the attractive borders towns of Melrose, Bowden and Jedburgh.
  • Admiring far-reaching views over the border country from the slopes of the Eildon Hills.
  • Spending the night on the tranquil Holy Island, with its 16th century Lindisfarne Castle and Priory, home to the Lindisfarne Gospels.

Bridging the national border between Scotland and England, this 62-mile 7 night walking tour, takes in the entire St Cuthbert’s Way, staying in accommodation on the Holy Island of Lindisfarne at the end of the walk. This is a great opportunity to spend more time exploring this historical island and provides a spectacular finale for your walking holiday.

St Cuthbert’s Way follows the story of a 7th century saint who traveled through Scotland and northern England, spreading the Gospel and performing healing miracles. Beginning at Melrose, where the saint started his ministry, and ending at Holy Island where he ended his days, the trail passes through scenery of great variety and beauty.

The walk takes in heather-clad hills, tranquil riverbanks and old Roman roads, visiting attractive villages and border towns along the way. Particular sites of interest include the ruin of Dryburgh Abbey, Cessford Castle, St Cuthbert’s Cave and the Holy Island of Lindisfarne, complete with its ruined abbey and spectacular castle.

Important information
Note: The causeway on to Holy Island can only be crossed during low tide. Before booking please check the Holy Island Safe Crossing Times here.

 

The tour package inclusions and exclusions at a glance
What is included in this tour?Items that are included in the cost of tour price.
  • 7 nights accommodation in en-suite rooms (where available) in selected B&B’s, hotels, inns and guesthouses along the trail, or a short distance away via taxi provided at our expense.
  • Breakfast each day.
  • Door to door luggage transfer.
  • Maps with the route marked on and a guidebook or route notes describing the trail.
  • An information pack containing an itinerary, instructions on how to find your accommodation each night and a packing list.
  • Detailed travel instructions on how to get to the start of your holiday and back from the end of it.
What is not included in this tour?

Trail Facts

Total distance: 62 miles (99km).
Duration: 8 days/7 nights, 6 days walking
Minimum/maximum daily distances: 7 miles (11km)/15 miles (24km)
Waymarking: The trail is easy to follow with the assistance of the guidebook and maps provided.
Season: Start on any Saturday from March 2 to October 26 (other days of the week on request)
Tour Starts: Melrose.
Tour Ends: Holy Island.
Nearest Available Airport: Edinburgh airport or London Heathrow.

  1. Day 1 Travel to Melrose where your first night's accommodation has been booked

    St Cuthbert’s Way starts at the gates of the magnificent 12th century Melrose Abbey in the lively border town of Melrose.

  2. Day 2 Melrose to Harestanes(T). 15 miles (24km)

    Today starts with an invigorating climb over the iconic Eildon Hills, whose triple peaks are one of the best loved landmarks of the Scottish Borders. Dropping down into the village of Bowden, the route winds its way through gentle farmland and woodland, then along the tranquil banks of the Rivers Tweed. As you end enter the village of Maxton, you’ll be following in the footsteps of the Romans who built the original road, now a tree lined grassy track, passing Lady Lilliar’s Tomb.

  3. Day 3 Today starts with an invigorating climb over the iconic Eildon Hills, whose triple peaks are one of the best loved landmarks of the Scottish Borders. Dropping down into the village of Bowden, the route winds its way through gentle farmland and woodland, then along the tranquil banks of the Rivers Tweed. As you end enter the village of Maxton, you'll be following in the footsteps of the Romans who built the original road, now a tree lined grassy track, passing Lady Lilliar's Tomb.

    Today starts with an invigorating climb over the iconic Eildon Hills, whose triple peaks are one of the best loved landmarks of the Scottish Borders. Dropping down into the village of Bowden, the route winds its way through gentle farmland and woodland, then along the tranquil banks of the Rivers Tweed. As you end enter the village of Maxton, you’ll be following in the footsteps of the Romans who built the original road, now a tree lined grassy track, passing Lady Lilliar’s Tomb.

    Setting off today you’ll cross the Monteviot Suspension Bridge, and meander along the banks of the River Teviot. Soon the route branches off through woodland, in springtime strewn with bluebells, and then on wards on farm paths and tracks through rich agricultural land to Cessford. Cessford Castle, once the stronghold of the Kers, is directly on the route as you continue on into Morebattle.

  4. Day 4 Morebattle to Kirk Yetholm. 7.5 miles (12km)

    First a climb via Grubbit Law along the ridge to Wideopen Hills, at 400 m the highest point on St Cutherbert’s Way and halfway from Melrose to Holy Island. Looking back across the Borders to the Eildons, gives you a good chance to measure your progress!

  5. Day 5 Kirk Yetholm to Wooler. 13 miles (21km)

    This next section of St. Cuthbert’s Way coincides with the final stretch of the Pennine Way. Climbing up from Halterburn around Green Humbleton (287m) – the first of many hillforts along St. Cuthbert’s Way – you will soon reach the national border between Scotland and England. At the border you will cross into Northumberland National Park, one of Britain’s best kept secrets. From here the trail drops back down via Elsdonburn to Hethpool, at the head of the College valley and home of the Collingwood Oaks. Then onwards through woodland and a good track along the Cheviot foothills, heading for Yeavering Bell (361m), Northumberland’s largest Iron Age fort. A lovely path leads through the heather over Gains Law down to the small market town of Wooler.

  6. Day 6 Wooler to Fenwick(T). 11.5 miles (18.5km)

    Today you walk over Weetwood Moor, where a short diversion on one of the circular short walks off the long distance route will take you to prehistoric rock carvings. Dropping back down to cross the River Till via the 16th Century Weetwood Bridge, quiet lanes lead to Horton, and onto another section of typically dead-straight Roman road: the Devil’s Causeway, which once linked Corbridge and Tweedmouth. Farmland and woodland tracks lead up to St. Cuthbert’s Cave, where monks took St. Cuthbert’s body in 875AD as they fled from Viking raids on Lindisfarne.

    Above the cave on the rocky ridge of the Kyloe Hills, the first tantalising views of your final destination come into sight with Holy Island clearly visible above the glittering sands, and Bamburgh Castle just to the south. It’s clear to see why this part of the Northumberland coast has been designated an area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. You continue through Shiellow Wood towards the village of Fenwick.

  7. Day 7 Fenwick(T) to Holy Island. 7 miles (11km)

    The trail heads out this morning to the coast along historic paths and tracks, passing Fenwick Granary, crossing the main east coast railway line and Beal Cast Burn, past World War 2 coastal defence reaching the Cuaseway at low tide for your crossing to Holy Island. Note: The causeway on to Holy Island can only be crossed during low tide. Before booking please check the Holy Island Safe Crossing Times here.

  8. Day 8 Depart from Holy Island after breakfast

    This itinerary lists our preferred overnight stops for this tour. Sometimes there may be a shortage of available accommodation in a preferred location, in which case we will transfer you from the trail to your accommodation and back again at no extra charge. Overnight stops marked with a (T) will always require transfers as standard.

    The daily mileages quoted are average trail miles only and do not include the distance from the trail to your accommodation. We do not expect you to have to walk more than a mile from the trail to your accommodation; should your accommodation be further than this, transfers will be provided as standard.

    Transfers allow your holiday to go ahead when accommodation directly on the route is unavailable. Local taxi operators (or your hosts for the night) will pick you up from a suitable location near the trail and take you to your night’s stay; then, the following morning they’ll drop you back off right where you were picked up so you can continue your walk.

    Since we foot the extra bill for transfers, you can rest assured that we’ll get you on the trail whenever we can.

St Cuthberts Way Map-s
Accommodation

7 nights accommodation in en-suite rooms with private bathrooms (where available) in selected guesthouses, inns and hotels and B&B’s.

Below are the additional costs that may apply depending on your requirements. Our standard prices per person are based upon two people sharing a room; if you are walking on your own, or are part of a group but require a room of your own, then the Solo Walker or Single Supplements apply respectively:

Singles: Add $62 per night for a single room; solo traveler: add $93 per night

Suggested Extra Options:

Whether you want to spend a day exploring, writing postcards or resting your weary feet, an extra night is a wonderful way to extend your holiday and experience more of the sights and sounds on St Cuthbert’s Way.

Many people choose to have an extra night in Melrose at the start of the trail so that they can explore this charming Borders town with its magnificent ruined abbey. Others take one of the frequent buses to Sir Walter Scott’s former home at Abbotsford, which lies 3 miles west of Melrose.

If you would like to visit Jedburgh, an attractive town with many interesting sites including a grand ruined abbey, Jedburgh Castle Jail and Museum and Mary Queen of Scots’ House, consider taking an extra night in Harestanes. A popular short walk from Harestanes leads up to the Waterloo Monument, a superb viewpoint.

Another popular choice for an extra night is at the end of the trail on the beautiful island of Lindisfarne, with its Magnificent castle, ruined priory and museum and attractive little harbor.

You can add rest days at any of the overnight stops:

Extra night (Standard) $103.00 per person / per night
Extra night (Holy Island) $130.00 per person / per night

Arrival in Melrose. The nearest rail station to the start of the trail (Melrose) is at Tweedbank (about 6 miles away). Trains furn regularly from Edinburgh city center to Tweedbank (1 hr). Trains run from London Kings Cross station to Tweedbank (approx 5 hrs 50 min). From there a bus/taxi will be required to Melrose.

Departure from Holy Island. The nearest rail station to the end of the trail (Lindisfarne) is at Berwick-upon-Tweed (about 13.5 miles away). Trains to Edinburgh on a frequent schedule (approx 45 min); train to London Kings Cross (3 hrs 40 min).

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